All 2019 Jaguar I-Pace EVs Recalled Over Battery Fire Risk. Yes, Again

The Jaguar I-Pace was the British marque’s first mass-produced electric model and one of the first long-range EVs on the market. However, I-Pace owners went through a pretty bumpy ride, starting with rather steep depreciation and then experiencing a massive recall that tried to address the issue of battery packs catching on fire.

Last year, Jaguar started a recall for almost 6,400 I-Pace EVs sold in the United States to apply a software update that would monitor the health of the battery pack. All model years, from 2019 to 2024, were affected, and some vehicles needed a new battery energy control module. Jaguar also said that if a vehicle needed a new battery pack, that would be taken care of, free of charge. However, there’s now a new recall in place for early I-Paces but the problem is, there isn’t a fix yet.

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Jaguar’s first EV recalled a second time for the same issue

Jaguar is recalling all 2019 I-Pace EVs sold in the United States for a second time to try and sort out an issue that might lead to the high-voltage battery to catch fire. The problem is, this second recall doesn’t provide a fix yet.

According to documents from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), all 2019 Jaguar I-Pace units sold in the United States–that’s 258 vehicles–have battery packs that are “exposed to multiple technical issues” that may lead to an increased risk of thermal overload.

The NHTSA safety recall report mentions that the battery packs, which were manufactured between March 1, 2018, and May 31, 2018, have a greater propensity for short circuits in the battery cells, especially if the state of charge is over 85%. The NHTSA said that cars that were already fixed through the previous safety recall are less likely to experience thermal overload, but “to remove all doubt for this population, this safety recall is being undertaken,” the federal administration added.

In other words, if a 2019 Jaguar I-Pace is charged over 85%, smoke or fire may erupt from the high-voltage battery, which could result in injuries and property damage if the car is parked indoors.

The fix is still under development, and until Jaguar comes up with a permanent solution, it advises customers to only charge their EVs to a maximum of 75% SoC and to only park outside and away from buildings.

The battery cells that power the I-Pace were manufactured by LG Energy Solution. The same company made the batteries for the Chevrolet Bolt EV, Bolt EUV, and the Hyundai Kona Electric, which were also part of huge battery recalls.

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