An $849 electric trike that is surprisingly good! Viribus e-trike review

Electric tricycles are having something of an e-bike renaissance. They’ve been around for years, but now they’re finally starting to get the credit they deserve as both utilitarian runabouts and a great way for older riders to get back in the saddle again. I’ve been testing out the Viribus Trio Plus e-trike (the dual-chain version), and I’m blown away by how good this e-bike is for the price.

It’s not even the most affordable e-trike that Viribus offers. The company’s entry-level trike model is priced at just $779, but that’s for a single-chain setup. The slicker dual-chain model uses a more typical trike jackshaft setup and is priced at $849 (though that is the current sale price, marked down from an MSRP of $1,299).

At under $900, it certainly cuts a few corners. But you still get a surprisingly good ride with this e-trike!

Check out my experience in my video review below, or keep on reading for even more info!

Viribus electric trike video review

Viribus Trio Plus Electric Tricycle Dual Chain tech specs

  • Motor: 350W front geared hub motor (650 W peak)
  • Top speed: 13.6 mph (22 km/h)
  • Pedal-assist range: Up to 30 miles (48 km)
  • Throttle range: 21.7 mi (35 km)
  • Battery: 36V 10Ah (360 Wh)
  • Weight: 87 lb (39 kg)
  • Max load: 330 lb (150 kg)
  • Rear rack max load: 55 lb (25 kg)
  • Brakes: Mechanical disc brakes
  • Price$849
  • Extras: LED display, three pedal assist settings, thumb throttle, rear basket, LED headlight, choice of 24-inch or 26-inch tires

What can you possibly get for this price?

OK, now right, off the bat, I will tell you this is not the nicest or highest-performance electric trike out there. The Lectric XP Trike has much higher performance, and the RadTrike is much nicer. But this model costs significantly less than both of those and yet still offers a great ride, which is why I wanted to feature it today.

A theme that you’re going to see here is that much of the trike is fine, but not great. And that’s OK for a budget model, as long as it’s still safe and effective, which it definitely seems to be.

The electronics are merely basic, but they’ll be sufficient for most casual riders. A 350W continuous and 650W peak motor gets you rolling faster than you might expect, though it likely won’t climb hills quite like the 1,000+ watt motor in the XP Trike. With the low-geared single-speed drivetrain, though, you could always help it up a hill if you were… so inclined.

The good news about the lower power operation is that it sips away slowly at that 360 Wh battery, though that battery isn’t a very big power plant, either. You can get around 20 miles of range on throttle-only riding or 30 miles on pedal assist. And again, that’s likely enough for most riders.

On the bike component side of things, again, we’re looking at a mostly basic setup. I mentioned the single-speed, which has its advantages and disadvantages. But then there’s no suspension, no parking brake, and only a front headlight (though you do get dual reflectors in the rear that look like taillights).

The dual mechanical disc brakes seem plenty strong for stops, though, and I can’t really complain about a sub $900 electric trike not having hydraulic disc brakes, now can I?

But despite the parts being fairly simple, the experience is what really matters here.

The carbon-steel frame isn’t light but is still attractive, meaning this bike looks well under its 8-pound curb weight. The guards around the wheels are a nice touch, especially for new riders who can accidentally get their wheels caught on obstacles while getting used to a wider rear end.

The fact that Viribus gives you an option of 24-inch or 26-inch wheels is nice, too, though I definitely recommend going with the 24-inch option. The lower ride height makes it feel a bit more stable, and you won’t miss the slightly improved ride quality you get from the tad larger 26-inch wheels.

At this price, I’m frankly amazed that the bike looks and feels as good as it does. Yes, there’s a bit of wobble in the stem – these just aren’t top-shelf bike parts. But you’re not going that fast anyway. The top speed is barely 13 mph with a tail wind, so you’re not going to get away from yourself here.

That’s fairly par for the course, with most e-trikes being limited to 14 or 15 mph as a nod toward safety. The last thing you want in a three-wheeler is to take a high-speed turn, so limiting the speed makes sense since these types of e-bikes are largely geared toward older riders – though, if you ask me, this 34-year-old electric bike reviewer had a boatload of fun riding this trike, so I don’t think we should consider this a bike just for older riders.

All told, I’m blown away by how nice the bike is at this price. A sub-$900 electric trike used to sound to me like a recipe for disaster. But as it turns out, if you’re OK with giving up a few fancier features, like a big display, lightweight aluminum frame, and powerful motors, you can end up with a quite nice and relaxing ride. Sure, it’s a bit of a slower and heavier trike, but it gets the job done! This might not be the way I typically get around, but I can absolutely recommend it to anyone looking for a cheap e-trike that doesn’t feel too cheap.

If you have a bit more cash, a $1,500 XP Trike is a major step up. But for the tightest e-trike budget, I still recommend Viribus as a great option.

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