Scout Trademarks Lineup of Historic Nameplates

The Volkswagen Group’s new Scout Motors brand is getting ready for its market launch by trademarking a long list of potential nameplates for electric off-roaders.

First spotted by Autoblog, Scout has applied for trademarks on at least 29 vehicle names with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Many of these are historic nameplates such as Scout 80—the name of the first Scout model launched by International Harvester in 1960—as well as Scout 800 and Scout II.

1971-80 International Harvester Scout

Other names cover option packages or variants connected to the original Scout models, which were produced by International Harvester—a company primarily known for agricultural equipment and commercial trucks—up to 1980. These include: Aristocrat, Rallye, Sno-Star, Sportstar, SR-2, SSII, Spirit, Super Scout, Terra, Terrastar, Trailstar, Travelstar, Travelstar XL, and Traveltop.

Also of note are several names seemingly nodding at the agricultural nature of the Scout’s original manufacturer: Baler, Cultivator, Forma, Grade, Harrow, Hauler, Reaper, Scythe, Swather, Tellus, and Thresher. Scout also trademarked the name Carolina, which makes sense as the Scout EVs are slated to be built at brand new factory near Columbia, South Carolina. Close to $2 billion will be invested in the site, which VW has said could produce 200,000 vehicles annually.

Teaser for Scout SUV concept

VW announced the Scout brand in 2022, appointing former VW Group of America CEO Scott Keogh to lead it. The German automaker acquired the rights to the Scout name when it bought International Harvester successor company Navistar in 2020. The 21st century Scout models will include a rugged electric SUV and pickup truck, with an initial concept vehicle scheduled to be revealed in 2024.

Keogh recently confirmed that the Scout SUV and pickup are being developed with Magna International. The Scout CEO previously said the SUV will be launched first, likely in 2026, and will aim for a $40,000 price bracket.

This article was originally published by Motor Authority, an editorial partner of ClassicCars.com

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